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Supporting the Arts


  • The Bemidji Community is full of vibrant art and beauty. From the unique statues that align our city streets to the first Friday art walks, art is something that is not only appreciated, but celebrated. At Security BankUSA, we support artistic talent and we are proud to showcase our unique and diverse art collection throughout our bank. You are invited to come see for yourself! You won't be disappointed.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Rebecca Silus Untitled by Rebecca Silus Inspired by the Hennepin Avenue Bridge in Minneapolis, Silus uses landscape to explore concepts of history, time and memory.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Michael D. Bigger Untitled by Michael D. Bigger This classic, contemporary abstract employs Bigger's signature - careful balance of formal elements in an assembly of cut out shapes made of aluminum, stainless steel, and plexiglass.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Jung Min Lee Untitled by Jung Min Lee No particular message, or story but simply and interplay of parts integrated within a space. Acrylic, Japanese paper, collage on canvas.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Greg Dickerson Untitled by Greg Dickerson Abstract and neo-expressionism movements and mixed media on wood panels.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Chris Jensen Untitled by Chris Jensen This photograph speaks to the viewer for itself. There are many conclusions one might draw from the unlikely and seemingly absurd installation of books placed throughout a kitchen. Perhaps it is a statement about cooking, reading, or both, or neither.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Bernard Katz Untitled by Bernard Katz Blown glass sculpture found in the natural world such as driftwood, rock formations or reflections in water.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Ann-Marie Rose Untitled by Ann-Marie Rose Digital photograph drawn to nature and the interrelationships found in the natural man-made environment.
  • <em>Remolino</em> by Gary Erickson Remolino by Gary Erickson This mysterious and sensual enclosed form with rhythmic ribs, leaves the viewer to determine its origin and meaning. All of Erickson's sculptural forms are ambiguous, yet often reminiscent of sea creatures or strange plant forms.
  • <em>Recluse</em> by Willy Heeks Recluse by Willy Heeks This oil on canvas piece is a configuration of organic color and from that translates the complexity of the environment into a painted surface.
  • <em>Penguin</em> by Leo Sewell Penguin by Leo Sewell The Penguin is a sculpture made from reclaimed objects assembled by bolts, screws and nails.
  • <em>New Pony</em> by Michael Sweere New Pony by Michael Sweere A collage of recycled tin.
  • <em>Indians and Things</em> by Michael Sweere Indians and Things by Michael Sweere A collage of recycled materials.
  • <em>Greenhouse lll</em> by Greg Kelsey Greenhouse lll by Greg Kelsey Abstract expressionistic painting of acrylic on canvas.
  • Eleanor McGough Eleanor McGough Acrylic on paper painting of flowers, vines, foliage and branches are transformed into lushly colorful and decorative patterns.
  • <em>Evening Oaks</em> by Michael Sweere Evening Oaks by Michael Sweere Recycled packaging and mosaic.
  • <em>Elevation</em> by Glenn Grafelman Elevation by Glenn Grafelman Oil on canvas, a fusion of precisely engineered rectangles, lines and bars wonderfully composed on field of intense colors.
  • <em>Dregs #2</em> by James Kielkopf Dregs #2 by James Kielkopf Painting from hand-cut Masonite in curvilinear shapes. The shapes are assembled into fluid compositions to achieve a delicate balance of color and shape.
  • <em>Deep Snow</em> by Rod Massey Deep Snow by Rod Massey Massey depicts his south Minneapolis neighborhood after the Halloween Blizzard of 1992, in a primitive, self-taught style using oil on masonite.
  • <em>Codex of Extinct Birds Series</em> by Christine Arle Baeumler Codex of Extinct Birds Series by Christine Arle Baeumler A collage of assembled wood panels with gestural illustrations of extinct birds from around the world.
  • <em>Chanticleer's song</em> by Marley Kaul Chanticleer's song by Marley Kaul Oil painting.
  • <em>Businessman Bob</em> by John Cisney Businessman Bob by John Cisney This contemporary folk sculpture made from acrylic on wood pokes fun at the business world.
  • <em>Bird Theater</em> by Arne Nyen Bird Theater by Arne Nyen Mixed media, unique form of expression into a variety of art medias
  • <em>Autumn Pond</em> by Michael Sweere Autumn Pond by Michael Sweere Re-cycled packaging and mosaic. "Acquires" raw materials from a variety of sources. Thrift stores, building sites and abandoned lots are often good hunting grounds.
  • <em>April Hiker</em> by Arne Nyen April Hiker by Arne Nyen April Hiker represents a fantasy based on an early spring hike along the Mississippi River bluffs. This artwork is made from acrylic on stryo foam with modeling paste.
  • <em>After Dylan's Shooting Star</em> by Judith Meyers Altobell After Dylan's Shooting Star by Judith Meyers Altobell This sculpture relates two dimensional space to three dimensional space - juxtaposing reality with illusion.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Therman Statom Untitled by Therman Statom Since his undergraduate years at Rhode Island School of Design, and at Pratt Institute(New York), where he earned a master of fine arts degree in sculpture, Statom has always been innovative - in materials, process, and form. He was amoung the first artists working in glass to create room-scale installations. These incorporated both his sculptural forms fabricated from sheets of plate glass and boldly brushed paint strokes and applied glass shards and other more dispatate objects that modulate the crystalline transparency of the glass and characterize his style.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Jon Neuse Untitled by Jon Neuse A monotype is always an original or one of a kind work of art. It is a single print pulled from a glass or metal plate which ink or paint has been applied. The image is transferred to paper by hand rubbing or with a printing press. A monotype remains a one of a kind work of art because it contains no repeatable matrix in the image from which a perfect and identical second impression can be made.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Deborah Baxter Untitled by Deborah Baxter Ms. Baxter, in her early 20's, is primarily a sculptor, but has also explored her interest in abstraction through film, video, and writing with much recent success. Her painted metal sculptures, often maquettes for larger scale proposals, draw from the surreal tendencies of artists like Miro, but Baxter also implies a strong connection to the real world with her elements that often suggest recognizable objects. So too, her use of cut and welded steel anchors the work in a reality that contrasts eloquently with the loose play of shapes and colors.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Charles Arnoldi Untitled by Charles Arnoldi Arnoldi's methods reveal his deep relationship to both the material he uses and his intent to convey how those materials lie at the heart of his work. As a painter, sculptor and printmaker, Arnoldi consistently uses wood, either found or cut to create his ultimate form. Arnoldi finds in the monotype process the opportuninty to use wood surfaces to shape and mold the often hand made paper to a surface that immediately and convincingly relates the final image to its source. There is a unique blend of imposed texture that underlines the many layers of color, implying elements of nature from which he sees it, all else springs. Atop that surface, with its many ruts and channels, the composition of color and painted shapes is given added life and the two surfaces then together form an image that is both subtle and intense.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Brad Devlin Untitled by Brad Devlin These relief collages explore the formal elements and principles of design including balance, repetition, and positive/negative space. These intimate abstract icons invite close inspection of the intriguing mix of materials and rich, varied textures.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Matthew Seasholtz Untitled by Matthew Seasholtz Matt Seasholtz began working with glass in 1985 after a brief career as a mechanical engineer. His introduction to blowing glass came at Glasslight Studios where he was a senior gaffer and product designer of custom blown glass light fixtures. In the 1990's, as an independent artist, he began to design and produce his own lines of functional and sculptural blown glass.
  • <em>Untitled</em> by Matthew Seasholtz Untitled by Matthew Seasholtz Matt Seasholtz began working with glass in 1985 after a brief career as a mechanical engineer. His introduction to blowing glass came at Glasslight Studios where he was a senior gaffer and product designer of custom blown glass light fixtures. In the 1990's, as an independent artist, he began to design and produce his own lines of functional and sculptural blown glass.
  • <em>The Celebration</em> by Michael P Daly The Celebration by Michael P Daly Influences of traditional Chinese painting and calligraphy are evident in Daly's paintings by the quick, gestural strokes and fluid use of the media. Evident in this piece as in most of his paintings is an energetic spirit and a love of life.
  • <em>The Poetry of Trees</em> by Cunningham Group Architects The Poetry of Trees by Cunningham Group Architects Crafted from reclaimed lumber salvaged by The Reuse Center, the structure continues the lives of the trees from which it came from.
  • <em>The Arms of the Elm</em> by Lee Tollefson The Arms of the Elm by Lee Tollefson A beautiful elm is wrapped by a spiraling tree house that leads one upward into its canopy. Insipred by the poem "Trees" by Joyce Kilmer.
  • <em>Sugar Maple Ship</em> by James R. Robin Sugar Maple Ship by James R. Robin A magical ship appears to be caught high within the branches of a sugar maple tree.
  • <em>Growth</em> by Jon Vandervelde Growth by Jon Vandervelde A three-dimensional lattice spiral encircles a mature red oak and extends into the separate world of the tree's canopy and creatures.
  • <em>A House of Trees</em> by Paul Mellblom A House of Trees by Paul Mellblom Tree trunks and the continuous canopy of jack pine grove define rooms of a natural shelter. A lone door beckons the curious to enter.
  • <em>Summer Lemonade</em> by Patricia Hidson Summer Lemonade by Patricia Hidson The feast of color and pattern in this Matisse-like interior celebrates life and reflects a love of home. Hidson is known for her fresh and spontaneous expression using energetic , and loosely controlled brush strokes as she captures aspects of domestic life. The optimism in her work is infectious and inspires an uplifting spirit.
  • <em>Summer Bounty</em> by Patricia Hidson Summer Bounty by Patricia Hidson The feast of color and pattern in this Matisse-like interior celebrates life and reflects a love of home. Hidson is known for her fresh and spontaneous expression using energetic , and loosely controlled brush strokes as she captures aspects of domestic life. The optimism in her work is infectious and inspires an uplifting spirit.
  • <em>Spectacle</em> by Caleb Nichols Spectacle by Caleb Nichols Influenced by Japanese art, a quiet sensibility is emerged in the work of Nichols after years of experimenting in the studio. In his quest to "build a better vocabulary," he has mastered such standards as blowing, casting, annealing and fusing. He has even devised one of his own: "smashing." "I blow these forms," he states, "then hit them with a hammer." This leaves him with chunks of glass the become fog, froth, foam, waves, beach stones and boulders in his fused works. This technique allows him to work bigger without requiring assistance, and gives his work its distinctively rough dynamics.
  • <em>Linus</em> Linus
  • <em>Lances</em> by Johann Richard Sebasttian Lances by Johann Richard Sebasttian "For 20 years, Richard Sebasttian's goal as an artist has been to protray and interpret earth oriented cultures, specifically the native peoples of North America. Sebasttian is spiritually involved, adopted by, and given the Santee Dakotah Indian name of Sanyan Tawa Wicasta by the Prairie Island Indian Reservation. His works are a serious and careful effort to respectfully pay tribute to native peoples. In a contemporary style, he creates opjects that speak to the spiritual aspects of a ritual in the everyday lives of Native Americans. During council meetings members can speak only when they have possession of the "story stick." Sebasttian's "lances" resemble these sticks, and are most often made out of striped and dried cottonwood lengths with Czech glass trade beads set in limestone bases. Native Americans use the lance in many ways - as a warrior and in council mettings. As a contemporary artist, Sebasttian's work expands on the idea of the "lance" through size, media, and color.
  • <em>International Tea #3</em> by Kathryn Youngs International Tea #3 by Kathryn Youngs A Cubism influence is evident as essential elements of the "pitcher" are reduced to geometric forms with assigned flat areas of color.
  • <em>Gossip</em> by Howard Hodgkin Gossip by Howard Hodgkin Howard Hodgkin, now in his 60's, has been a driving force in contemporary abstraction for several years. He works with layer upon layer of translucent color and abstracted forms that imply, not a particular image, but a mood of certain time and place. This piece, with its hint of an eye in the center has a presistent feel of mutual observation - the viewer is caught in the swirl and sweep of intense blues and oranges that suggest movement of the surface and imply depth.
  • <em>Eco Turtle</em> by Kathy Gustafson Eco Turtle by Kathy Gustafson
  • <em>Cello</em> by Rick McIntyre Cello by Rick McIntyre During a hang gliding trip to Switzerland, Rick spent a lot of time in Paris and London viewing fine art. At the Tate Gallery in London he viewed some minimalist sculpture by Barbara Hepwoth. After returning home, he sculpted a pure abstract sculpture out of surfboard foam, which was the beginning of his sculpting career. For the past ten years, he has been making a living in the advanced composite industry, building carbon fiber catamarans and kit aircrafts.
  • <em>Bagatelle, Paris, France</em> by Lynn Geesaman Bagatelle, Paris, France by Lynn Geesaman
  • <em>An American B</em> by Robert Cottingham An American B by Robert Cottingham "Printmaking is an alternative art world. For me, it provides a perfect opportunity to escape the solitude of the painting studio. I relish the spirit of collaboration and experimentation of the print shop, the trial and error procedures, the happy accidents, and the inevitably unpredictable results that this process offers. In addition to all this, printmaking makes visual ideas more accessible." -Robert Cottingham
  • <em>#10 Bodnant Garden, Wales</em> by Lynn Geesaman #10 Bodnant Garden, Wales by Lynn Geesaman

 


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